Plunket Art Show opening night sold out


Organizers of Timaru’s annual fundraiser for Plunket are busy preparing the city gallery for a sold-out opening night on Friday.

The sold-out Plunket Art Show is in its 44th year and is raising money for the Timaru branch of Plunket.

The event, which opens at 7 p.m. Friday at the Aigantighe Art Gallery, has raised $150,000 in the past six years alone, organizer Di Hay said.

She said the longevity of the event is a testament to the continued support it receives from the community.

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All of the artwork in the exhibition is on sale on opening night and throughout the two-week exhibition that follows.

37 artists from across the country take part, including artists from South Canterbury such as Mike Armstrong, Gala Kirke, Annie Lambourne and Ava Young.

The mixed media exhibition will feature ceramics, glass, sculptures, prints, oil and acrylic paintings.

Diana Young and Annie Lambourne unpacking works ahead of this year's Plunket art exhibition at Aigantighe <a class=Art Gallery.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

JOHN BISSET/Stuff

Diana Young and Annie Lambourne unpacking works ahead of this year’s Plunket art exhibition at Aigantighe Art Gallery.

Hay said pricing starts at under $100 and goes up to over $12,000.

This year’s opening night will include a short live auction, as well as the traditional silent auction.

Hay said the use of South Canterbury’s “highly respected regional art gallery, the Aigantighe, gives the event enormous national credibility and encourages artists to take part”.

She said the exhibition regularly draws the biggest crowds to the gallery year-round.

Artist Timaru Mike Armstrong is displaying several objects at this year's Plunket <a class=Art Show, including the exhibit’s most expensive work, The Greater and Lesser Cataclysms.” style=”width:100%;display:inline-block”/>

JOHN KIRK-ANDERSON/Stuff

Artist Timaru Mike Armstrong is displaying several objects at this year’s Plunket Art Show, including the exhibit’s most expensive work, The Greater and Lesser Cataclysms.

The show was canceled in 2020 due to the pandemic, but was back the following year.

Whānau Āwhina Plunket Timaru serves all of South Canterbury, with 19 clinics and a family center located in Timaru.

Plunket, which is over 115 years old and has its origins in Karitāne, near Dunedin, is the country’s largest support service for the health and wellbeing of preschool children and their whānau.

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